My Blog List

Thursday, October 26, 2017

An American Family by Khizr Khan




Immigrant stories have always appealed to me. My three children are themselves immigrants and every success story which is full of happiness and success brings a lot of happiness to me personally as well as I know it echoes my own wishes for my own children.

This story which propelled one family into prominence through the sad death of their son is no exception. Like most immigrants the Khans were hard working, god fearing, simple folk. The fact that they were Muslim was incidental to the entire issue. That their son was a Muslim who worked in the American forces and was killed in the line of duty is also a fact. That the situation was politicized for someone's gain is shameful.

The title of the book says it all. The Khans brought up their sons the American way, with strong beliefs in the power of justice and equality for all. The parents were strong supportive parents in no way radicalized or partial towards a single group of people. The story of their lives was of huge interest and the way the story unfolds is beautiful.

Mr. Khan Snr spoke up for what he felt was right and he was pilloried and his family was reviled for that. He must be admired that he still believes in what he said and stands up for what is right. From very humble beginnings in Pakistan to Harvard is no easy feat. He and his wife also brought up their children with very ethical and moral understandings and the memoir is a testimony to that.

I loved this book and the story of the Khans.

Sent to me by Netgalley for an unbiased review, courtesy of Random House Publishing.


4 comments:

Nise' said...

So glad you loved the book.

bermudaonion said...

What an important story. I'm very embarrassed about the way our president handles things like this.

Cleopatra Loves Books said...

Great review and it sounds like some important points to take note of.

Kathryn T said...

Sounds fantastic. Love the courage, bravery , may there be many more like him. Would be interested in reading this memoir myself.